Exclusive Interview with

R. Janet Walraven

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When did you start writing?

I began writing in high school--poetry mostly.

R. Janet Walraven
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What makes writing your passion?

My passion differs with each writing project. I wrote my teacher-mentor book after 35 years of being in K-12 classrooms. Many new teachers leave the profession after 3 to 5 years because they haven't been taught how to manage a classroom, how to communicate with parents, administrators, and staff, work too many hours with not enough pay, and mostly because they do not have a master teacher to mentor them. I am passionate about helping teachers.
My second book was a tribute to my parents. Their love story during World War II was a joy to write as a legacy for my family.
My third book is a children's book inspired by my Uncle Ken, an artist who wanted to illustrate the book but passed suddenly. I felt that I needed to continue the project to honor him.
Other stories and books are piling up in my head. I am passionate about getting all those ideas published, including a "hope" book for students and parents who feel marginalized.

R. Janet Walraven
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How long have you been writing?

I've been writing seriously for the past twelve years. I was prompted to do that after forming a writing group. That's an important part of my decision to self-publish.

R. Janet Walraven
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

Ecstatic. Holding it in my hands was very gratifying, even moreso when I did my first public book reading and signing.

R. Janet Walraven
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

Both of my first books and most of my short stories include real people whom I know. The children's book is about two little hedgehogs because my Uncle Ken had a passion for Albrecht Durer's art and created a woodcut with Durer holding a hedgehog. That was the stimulus for writing the story of two hedgehogs sneaking into the Louvre in Paris.

R. Janet Walraven
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

I feel great JOY when I'm in the writing zone. Marketing takes away a lot of writing time. It's also deflating and disappointing when people promise a review but don't follow through. It's taken some time for me to ignore those kinds of responses and just let it go.

R. Janet Walraven
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

I've never experienced writer's block. When I sit down to write, the characters speak to me, and the story flows.

R. Janet Walraven
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

Don't worry about what others say. Don't worry about grammar, spelling, formatting...any of that. Get it out of your head and onto paper. The rest can come later. Don't second-guess yourself. Everyone has a story to tell; your stories are as important and interesting as anyone else's. It does help to take some writing classes, and those abound on the internet.

R. Janet Walraven
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Start writing and publishing at a much younger age. Have confidence in myself. Don't compare myself to other writers. Be diligent!

R. Janet Walraven
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Of course, I read every book review. I print them off and put them in a notebook. I haven't had any bad reviews--just a couple who wrote some unnecessary spoilers. I've decided to learn what I can from anyone's review and let go of any negative responses.

R. Janet Walraven
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

Hurray! Thank you to those who are willing to take the time to write a response to the reading!

R. Janet Walraven
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

All of my books are definitely part of my real life--teaching, my parents' love story, and visiting the Louvre. Even my short stories are ones that I based on people I know. Poetry is definitely about happenings in my life. Write what you know!

R. Janet Walraven
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

The teacher-mentor book shows how I managed students and all the other education players, so, yes, I'm the major character. Otherwise, I have not based other characters in my books or short stories on myself. That may come at some time in the future.

R. Janet Walraven
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

Most people really do judge a book by its cover. No cover is as important as the story. A cover may appeal to the reader, but the story may be disappointing or not edited well. Good readers usually read reviews and the blurb on the back, as well as leafing through the book.

R. Janet Walraven
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Do you connect with your readers? Do you mind having a chat with them or you prefer to express yourself through your writing?

I express myself better in writing than verbally. However, I've done several podcasts and book readings that I enjoy very much. I'm happy to share my email if readers want to reach out with comments and questions.

R. Janet Walraven
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How do you feel when people appreciate your work or recognize you in public?

I've never been recognized in public, and I have no desire to become famous or rich due to being an author. When people respond about my books in writing or personally, that's very gratifying.

R. Janet Walraven
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Who is your favorite author? Why?

That's a difficult question. There are too many to list. My most inspirational writer is Wallace Stegner. Every time I read one of his books, I gain confidence. I wish I could have taken a writing class from him at Stanford, but his life was unfortunately cut short in an accident. He still inspires me.

R. Janet Walraven
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What’s the dream? Whom would you like to be as big as?

I have no dream of becoming a famous author. I have all this stuff in my head that I want to get out on paper, get it published, and if anyone reads it, that's great!

R. Janet Walraven
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Would you rewrite any of your books? Why?

I always think of more I could have written. So far, I do not feel the need to rewrite anything already published. As an English teacher, I told my students: rewrite, rewrite, rewrite. But that's before publishing. An author is never really finished with their manuscript. At some point, after rewriting and editing well, you have to say "Done."

R. Janet Walraven
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If you could switch places with any author – who would that be?

Barbara Kingsolver. I love her attitude toward life, her exciting adventures, her love of family, and the way she writes. She's amazing!

R. Janet Walraven