Exclusive Interview with

Pavel Cerny

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When did you start writing?

If I don’t count my early High School plays, I became a playwright and a screenwriter in the early 1970s. Then, being locked up during the pandemic, I wrote 4 prize-winning screenplays and a number of books. Four are already out on Amazon and elsewhere, two more are awaiting final touches and illustrations.

Pavel Cerny
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What makes writing your passion?

I can live dozens of lives this way. In my current books I can become the 5 year old Edgar Poe whose parents are killed by a vampire or Alex’s talking cat White Bim. I live through their emotions , joys, sadness and fears. I am every one of my characters. As the great French classic Flaubert said about his heroine Madame Bovary: “That’s me!”

Pavel Cerny
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How long have you been writing?

Pavel Cerny
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

Feeling of victory and exhalation that I became a published author. Also I was desperate when I realized how much I ended up paying for the promise of glory to my less than scrupulous publisher.

Pavel Cerny
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

Pavel Cerny
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

Not enough time and energy to write as much as I would like to; financial pressure.

Pavel Cerny
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

I get a little respite and then I force myself to type again, whether the text I was working on before or some other unfinished project (I have several in my desk). Most of all I am trying to force myself to sit behind the laptop and cut the trips to the fridge.

Pavel Cerny
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

A burning need to create a work that will make my readers laugh or cry or be scared along with me. I am always shocked by beginning authors who say; I want to become an author but do not know what to write about. If you don't know, that means that you do not have the strong urge to express yourself and rather do something easier. Get a regular job. Become a teacher. a nurse, a gardener…

Pavel Cerny
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

I would have started decades earlier. I just turned 75 and am just publishing my first books.--that means lots of catching up in such a demanding career as a writer.

Pavel Cerny
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Yes, I read most of my reviews. Meantime I have been very lucky, receiving amazing reviews both from journalists and readers.
I know that somewhere around the corner there is a review or two from someone who doesn’t like or doesn’t want to like my special world of imagination. But that’s alright, as they say: All the reviews are just one person’s opinions.

Pavel Cerny
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

A feeling of satisfaction that I was supposed to reach into the reviewer’s heart and for at least a short moment share what I feel.

Pavel Cerny
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Since my books in the meantime dealt with talking cats, vampires, and mysterious creatures, I can only incorporate my basic feelings of sympathy. But I have a couple of screenplays (including one that recently won a Cannes Film Awards) that can be very personal and difficult to write. This last one, based on a sad episode from my youth, made me use up a large portion of a box of tissues.

Pavel Cerny
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

Pavel Cerny
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

Covers and illustrations are an integral part of a good book. I engage the best illustrator I can afford and often search for many weeks before I find the right one.
At present, my favorite illustrator is the excellent Francisco Duenias Serrano whom I discovered all the way in Quito, Ecuador.

Pavel Cerny
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Do you connect with your readers? Do you mind having a chat with them or you prefer to express yourself through your writing?

Once the pandemic is over I would like to organize book signings, readings, (had one meantime) and am discussing a tour of Los Angeles elementary schools where I would talk to the students about writing and publishing a book, and then read them parts of my “Alex and the Amazing Catventures.”

Pavel Cerny
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How do you feel when people appreciate your work or recognize you in public?

Appreciation always gives me a warm feeling inside. As far as being recognized on the street, I would probably find it distracting. Unless the reader finds that my book helped them.

Pavel Cerny
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Who is your favorite author? Why?

So many to pick from! But if there is one book that stayed with me since my teenage years and I still re-read it, it is Antoine de Saint Exupery's “The Little Prince '', one of the most charming and wisest books there is.

Pavel Cerny
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What’s the dream? Whom would you like to be as big as?

I still teach in elementary schools (at 75 probably the oldest teacher in Los Angeles ) and I love the ideas of children’s classics which generations of children are reading every year. I have hopes that my “Alex and the Amazing Catventures” could become one of these evergreen classics. But who knows.

Pavel Cerny