Exclusive Interview with

Laurie Robertson

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When did you start writing?

About twenty years ago, I started writing Crossing at Sweet Grass with pen and paper. Eventually, laptops came popular and made writing way more fun.

Laurie Robertson
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What makes writing your passion?

I love adventures in all forms. It doesn't matter whether I'm experiencing a great alaskan adventure, reading, or watching an action-packed movie, I enjoy it all. Writing allows me to visit different lands, places, and fantasies in my imagination. I also love researching for stories by reading books or traveling to where my adventures take place.

Laurie Robertson
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How long have you been writing?

For about twenty years, but mostly as a hobby.

Laurie Robertson
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

I felt a great deal of accomplishment, excited and also sad because publishing meant I had to leave my characters. I also had a realization of "Oh my goodness, I have to market this book! What do I do now?"

Laurie Robertson
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

My stories, including Alive, Savannah the Zombie Slayer, have a central female character who is on the hero's journey. My female protagonist evolves from young to mature and capable. Although my main characters are self-reliant, they all love men for who they are. Together my characters build a community within my books.

Laurie Robertson
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

The high learning curve needed for writing and self-publishing. I like many authors I know really enjoy the writing part but not the marketing part. Another part I've had to mature into is accepting criticism. Usually, it's constructive and helpful but it can still sting.

Laurie Robertson
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

I just keep writing, even if I think the page in front of me is not very good, I keep typing, and the words and ideas start flowing. I always do several drafts so I don't feel that much pressure to deliver a finished product unti later.

Laurie Robertson
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

I write because I must, it's a drive deep within. My goal is to have people who enjoy my books as "my tribe." Luckily, I don't have to make money but of course, it would be great if I did. My advice to a new author is to keep writing and try to work out your brand early.

Laurie Robertson
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Stay in the lane, pick one genre! Of course, I'm all over the map when it comes to genres.

Laurie Robertson
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Yes I read my book reviews. With bad ones, my feelings get hurt but after a couple of days, I go back and review the comments. Some of them provide helpful insights to improve my writing.

Laurie Robertson
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

I feel happy and relieved that readers got into my story and enjoyed the characters. I feel like a bonified storyteller.

Laurie Robertson
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Yes but that's all I should say about that because sometimes my characters get into a lot of trouble.

Laurie Robertson
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

All my future, present and past stories align with female protagonists who come from the same maternal family line. All my stories are loosely connected and so much of the characters come from my family history.

Laurie Robertson
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

The book cover is certainly important in marketing and letting the reader know what kind of book they are getting into.

Laurie Robertson
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Do you connect with your readers? Do you mind having a chat with them or you prefer to express yourself through your writing?

I enjoy having chats with people who read my stories especially if they have questions about the story.

Laurie Robertson
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How do you feel when people appreciate your work or recognize you in public?

I feel satisfied when others appreciate my work because I've worked very hard on my novels.

Laurie Robertson
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Who is your favorite author? Why?

Charles Frazier, Cold Mountain. I love his descriptions of the Smokey Mountains and his poetic style.

Laurie Robertson
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What’s the dream? Whom would you like to be as big as?

My dream is to have a "tribe" of readers who appreciate my stories and as far as the size of that tribe, time will tell. I would like to travel to conferences and lecture about writing. That's my dream.

Laurie Robertson
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Would you rewrite any of your books? Why?

No, I have quite a few stories in my head, so I can't see myself going back and rewriting any. I might want to do a screenplay for my zombie series.

Laurie Robertson
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If you could switch places with any author – who would that be?

Laurie Robertson