Exclusive Interview with

Gavin Black

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When did you start writing?

I have written many short stories over the years but hadn't really focused on anything professional until I wrote Crop Burner.

Gavin Black
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What makes writing your passion?

I read a lot, and by a lot I mean I am obsessive about it. However, over the past few years I have found fewer and fewer things that felt unique and creative. I have found a passion in writing to fill the niche I believe is missing in fantasy. I also love interacting with the characters as I write; the voices in my head finally have a purpose!

Gavin Black
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How long have you been writing?

I have only been writing passionately for about four years now.

Gavin Black
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

Disbelief. After spending so much time laboring over my book, then putting it out to test readers and getting amazing feedback, I was unable to find any traction with agents which left me feeling defeated. It wasn't until a chance encounter with my publisher that finally propelled Crop Burner into the hands of my readers.

Gavin Black
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

I feel too often many characters are two dimensional in books: the heroes aren't accountable for their deeds and the villains aren't given the proper motivational background to do what they are doing. I often see heroes slaying and killing to meet an end goal without having to deal with the emotional impact those decisions/actions would have on their psyche, nor held accountable for destruction (regardless of what the greater good was accomplished). I prefer to create characters that are more down to earth and, instead of being placed solely in the good or bad brackets, live in the grey areas.

Gavin Black
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

Trying to find an agent or publisher who will read or examine a book to see if it is an excellent story and well-written. Instead, they seem too busy trying to push out what seems "hot" at the moment.

Gavin Black
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

As a writer, I find I sometimes tend to want a character to do something or react in a specific way to give the story more pizzazz; however, the character refuses to do it or the story feels clunky. I'll grab a sheet of blank paper and talk to my character. I will ask them what they want, what is frustrating them and, most importantly, why they refuse to move forward in my story. Once I let them tell me what they want to do and I let them react in the way they want in the moment, it usually leads to something far more interesting than I originally planned. If that doesn't work, I find a good night's rest helps. I tend to have very vivid dreams while writing my stories and they play out like movies, giving me the needed fuel to continue on the next day.

Gavin Black
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

I think the most important thing is writing about something you are passionate about or find a story that isn't out there for which you are eager to find the conclusion. Don't force the writing. If you truly hit a wall that you can't move past or are burning yourself out struggling to find an agent, take the time to leave it and do something else for a few weeks or a month. Let the passion of writing build up again. If you let it become a job, then all of the fun will drain out of it.

Gavin Black
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Start writing, you fool. Oh, and buy lots of stock in Amazon and Apple.

Gavin Black
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Yes. When it comes to bad reviews or critiques during beta readings, I try to see it from the reader's point of view. Sometimes, this has led to a rewrite which made the story better. Other times, I might scratch my head and not truly understand why someone hates my story so passionately. I tell myself it is a writer's job to pull out emotions in a reader and, if that happens to be utter hatred, I have still done my job. After all, I will not make everyone happy with any story I write.

Gavin Black
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

Curiosity. I love to see what someone has taken from the story. How did they interpret the themes I tried to bring across? What characters did they attach themselves to? I love discovering that readers found ideas or things they believe I intentionally wrote into the story that I never intended or realized.

Gavin Black
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Yes. I think we all do as authors. There is the famous saying that you write what you know. For example, while writing my novel "Crop Burner", my oldest son, who was still quite young at the time, asked my wife and I why people kissing on TV didn't make a baby. That was an idea I gave to my protagonist, Fearn.

Gavin Black
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

I don't think there are any characters I have written that would be a mirror image of me. I think I have sprinkled some of who I am into each of my characters. I mean - they all reside in my head so that has to say something about me.

Gavin Black
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

I have grown up reading so many fantasy novels where the cover was clearly drawn by someone who was given a vague idea of the story and the cover art seems to have nothing to do with the text inside. Subsequently, I give little credence to the idea that the cover will give me any idea what the story is really about. I feel like the publisher doesn't trust the story enough to tell you what the story is really about and tries to give you something they think will draw you in. Regardless, I always read the story with the cover in mind and love when it truly fits the story. I was really grateful to have a lot of say on how the cover of Crop Burner was portrayed.

Gavin Black
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Do you connect with your readers? Do you mind having a chat with them or you prefer to express yourself through your writing?

I love connecting with my readers. Some of my greatest experiences have been running into authors I admire and ending up having a conversation where I can tell they are really grateful for their readers and want to connect with them in some way. So feel free to reach out and say hi.

Gavin Black
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How do you feel when people appreciate your work or recognize you in public?

It doesn't happen often but when it does, it makes me happy that I have written something well enough to impact someone else.

Gavin Black
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Who is your favorite author? Why?

Wow, this is a question I don't think I can answer. It really depends on where I am in my life. If I need a good laugh, I may pick up a novel by Terry Pratchett. If I need an escape into a world that seems to exist in the shadows of ours, I will grab a novel by Neil Gaiman. Of course, I also have to mention Tolkien or any of the other Inklings who helped lay the groundwork for the realms of fantasy as we know them.

Gavin Black
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What’s the dream? Whom would you like to be as big as?

A call from Neil Gaiman asking if I want to co-write a book with him. The gold standard would be to be as big as Tolkien but I would settle for the following Patrick Rothfuss enjoys (though I promise to finish my books ;) ).

Gavin Black
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Would you rewrite any of your books? Why?

No, I treat my story like kids. They are born with a thought, grow up in the many drafts of the story and head out of the house when they are published. Once that story is out in the world, the readers determine its fate. I don't feel the need to meddle in that.