Exclusive Interview with

Donna Peizer

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When did you start writing?

In a sense, I have never not written. There was a time in my life when I was a practicing attorney, which required an incredible amount of writing. I worked for a time for a nonprofit doing technical writing, and later, I owned a small business and was responsible for all of the written policies, procedures and other such communications required either by law or simply to make things run smoothly. With these types of writing, I developed excellent language skills, but it was not until I was in my sixties that I began seriously to explore “creative writing.”

Donna Peizer
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What makes writing your passion?

The pure joy of self-expression.

Donna Peizer
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How long have you been writing?

I began to write memoir, personal essays and fiction in about 2010, but not consistently.

Donna Peizer
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

Pure, unadulterated fear mostly, but also some pride and gratitude at having accomplished the task of writing a novel and learning so much in the process.

Donna Peizer
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

As far as the characters in my novel go, I don’t feel like I chose them. It would be more accurate to say they chose me.

Donna Peizer
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

Because I am in my eighties and career pursuits are behind me now, I don’t view writing as a career. But what annoys me can be summed up in one word: marketing.

Donna Peizer
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

Writer’s block in my experience is trying to write something I don’t really want to be writing. Sometimes I get into writing a piece and then realize there is no substance to it, or I dislike it for other reasons. If I force myself to continue instead of moving on to another project, well, that’s going to produce writer’s block.

Donna Peizer
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

Keep going under all circumstances, as Natalie Goldberg says. And another word of sage advice from Goldberg: Be willing to write the worst sh*t ever. In other words, moderate your expectations and don’t stop. Do I always live up to these principles? Not a chance.

Donna Peizer
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

I would have talked myself out of become a registered nurse when I went to college. I would have studied the literary arts instead and not succumbed to the idea that one must be “practical.” “Go on,” I would have said. “Do it. See what you’ve got.” (My parents would have had a fit; they weren't that excited about me going to college in the first place.)

Donna Peizer
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Yes, I read all of the book reviews. I have been fortunate in that regard, and I so appreciate folks who take the time to post reviews. Early on, I got one editorial review that seemed to be a bit over the top on the “snark” scale, so I didn’t use it. If I ever were to get a review in the NYT, though, maybe I would not have the courage to read it!

Donna Peizer
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

I like it, of course. Usually, I feel pleased that the reviewer has gotten the message I was trying to convey. I particularly like reviews that comment on the strength of my character development.

Donna Peizer
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Yes, and I will leave it at that.

Donna Peizer
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

In my book, Somewhere Different Now, 14-year-old Annie is loosely based on me, and she’s the character with whom I most identify.

Donna Peizer
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

Yes and no. The conventional wisdom in the publishing world is that since the cover presents readers with their first impression of the book, it is rightfully very important. This seems right to me, just from my own experience as a reader. On the other hand, no cover can compensate for a poorly executed product inside.

Donna Peizer
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Do you connect with your readers? Do you mind having a chat with them or you prefer to express yourself through your writing?

I have not been very successful connecting with a young adult audience. This is something I am struggling with.

Donna Peizer