Exclusive Interview with

Don Jones

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When did you start writing?

Professionally, in 2000, although that was for books on various information technology topics. You know, the big books sold by the pound! I moved out of front-line tech in 2018 or so, and found that I missed writing a LOT. So I started thinking about all those stories that had been bouncing around in my head for 20-odd years, and decided to get serious about writing them down.

Don Jones
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What makes writing your passion?

I just love writing. I love telling stories. I love inventing new worlds, new ways of seeing things, and new places to escape to. Fantasy and sci-fi have been my safe space since I was really young, and writing is a way for me to retreat—and to maybe take some folks with me.

Don Jones
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How long have you been writing?

"Generally writing" probably... forever. I means seriously. I used to belong to Starfleet, an international Star Trek fan club, and I clearly remember writing some Starfleet Academy manuals—we used them to train up new chapter heads and such. I remember writing incredibly long emails at work in the mid 1990s. I just love putting words in order.

Don Jones
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

Honestly, it felt surreal. When you pick up the paperback copy for the first time, you see the cover design, you see YOUR words written down on tree leaves... it doesn't feel real at first. Then it feels amazing. And then it feels like you need to start writing the next one!

Don Jones
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

Oh, gosh. You know, I'd say that I wind up writing characters that I want to relate to in some way. If you dig, you probably see a lot of me and my insecurities, you probably see a lot of my friends, especially the ones we knew when I was younger. In my head, they're fully fleshed-out, real people. You don't always see all that in the novels, of course, but it's for sure there. They're very imperfect, like me, but they try hard, and they have a vision for themselves.

Don Jones
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

Getting in front of readers. Like, it's amazing how much programs like KDP have democratized publishing. I've always been upset that traditional publishers do relatively little work and yet keep the lion's share of the revenue—writers are lucky to make a dollar on a book sale. But indie publishers have this massive hurdle of getting in front of their readers, spreading the word, that kind of thing. I wish more readers were diligent about leaving honest reviews, because it makes more of a difference, on a human being's life and work, than anyone can possibly imagine.

Don Jones
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

I've never actually had it! I did a TikTok about it (https://www.tiktok.com/@donj_writes/video/7148069536510774574). I have a very disciplined and intensive process of blocking out the book, outlining it, and just doing a ton of up-front work. Once it comes to writing, all the decisions are made and I just get to be creative. A lot of the world-building and stuff comes at night as I'm waiting to fall asleep, or in a dream, or as I'm waking up, and I get that stuff into my blocking or notes documents ASAP. So I don't lose ideas. Sometimes, I'll write a couple of chapters to kind of capture what I think is a good idea, and then come back to it months and months later and start working on it.

Now some days, I'm not in a creative mood, and I know how to recognize that, and on those days I do other stuff. But figure at least 3-4 days a week I'm ready to write 5,000 words or so a day.

Don Jones
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

Write for the love of it. If all the marketing and editing and everything else is bumming you out (I personally get anxious about reading edits), then... don't. Don't commercialize your writing if that diminishes your love for it. Find people to help—my husband reads my edits for me and lets me know if it's bad or not, so I can brace myself. But above all, write for yourself, for the story, and for the people you want o read it. Write for the love of it.

Don Jones
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Stop being so afraid of what other people think. Constructive criticism—actionable things that are presented politely and professionally—is fine, but don't be AFRAID of it. Write the darn story. Put it out in the world. Did you know Tolkien rewrote Lord of the Rings like four times over a decade or more? It's fine. It's fine to not get it right. It's fine to try again. But there's no progress, no motion, unless you DO IT. So just... DO IT.

Don Jones
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Ugh. I do. The bad ones get me really upset. Not if they're honest, polite, and just critical, but if they're mean. I try to set them aside, maybe have a glass of whisky and remind myself that every book isn't for every reader, and that's okay. When a review does have something actionable, something I could do better, I try to thank the person (if I can) so that they can see their review mattered, and I try to learn from it and do better. But the mean ones, the heartless ones that come from Internet anonymity? Whisky.

Don Jones
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

It's a huge boost. Like, I did this thing, and someone cared. But I also try not to let it become an echo chamber—like, I can always try to do a little better the next time, right? So I try to learn from the positive reviews, "here's what worked." And I try to thank those reviewers, when I have the means to do so, so that they know what a big difference it made. We're all just fallible humans bouncing around on this rock, and to take a moment and say something kind about each other... if that's not God's true work, I don't know what is.

Don Jones
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Yyyyyeah, probably not in big ways, though. I honestly don't think my real life is all that interesting or useful! But now and then there'll be little things. I think if I did that a lot, I'd wind up focusing on the bad stuff, and that wouldn't always make for great writing. I dunno. Now you've got me thinking about it <grin>. Maybe in the next novel!

Don Jones
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

Um. Daniel, maybe, a little and in certain ways, from "Daniel Scratch: a story of witchkind." I was a lonely kid, but I was fine with it—like him. And I was a big reader like him, I learned so much from reading and still do. I wanted to be part of something special, like him, although every time that's actually happened to me it was terrifying and I found myself wanting out—like him. Daniel has a lot more going on than I ever did, but I relate to him in a lot of ways.

Don Jones
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

Yeah. I wish it wasn't, but it is. And I wish that because I suck at art, so I have to pay people to do covers, and I maybe resent the money a little, but the end result is always worth it. The cover is a story—it's part of the story. It needs to set the tone and the mood. I know I judge books heavily on their covers—even when just downloading a sample to my Kindle—so I have to remind myself that other people probably do as well.

Don Jones