Exclusive Interview with

Clayton Graham

BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

When did you start writing?

As a youngster growing up in the cobbled streets of Stockport, UK, I read a lot of science fiction, and loved the ‘old-school’ masters such as HG Wells, Jules Verne, Isaac Asimov and John Wyndham. Short stories were penned from an early age, but I did not start writing novels until I retired.

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

What makes writing your passion?

Combining future science with the paranormal is my passion. I love exploring what could happen to the human race in the future, within a universe [or multiverse] we are only just starting to understand.

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

How long have you been writing?

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

What was the feeling when you published your first book?

A great sense of achievement coupled with not a little relief.

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

People like you, people like me. Put them in the future to face uncertain challenges. Let them meet people [including aliens] that they do not initially understand. Let them grow.
In Milijun, for example, Laura Sinclair is a single mother who faces impossible odds. And she has a teenage son to boot!

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

Doesn’t happen very often, but the best remedies are either a complete break for a few days, or maybe just a walk to sample nature and get back to reality

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

The best advice I would give to new authors is to keep every word you write, or that enters your head. The advent of computers certainly helps with that. Some of my best ideas come when awakening, so a pad and pencil by the bedside is essential.
You may use those words ten years or more hence.

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

Yes, of course, especially just after publication. Bad ones [thankfully very few] I just ignore. Some people just get out of the wrong side of the bed in the morning.

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

What is the feeling when you get a good review?

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

Clayton Graham
BooksShelf-Interview-Icon.png

What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

Not as important as the story, but in this media-driven age extremely important. Perhaps not so much for hardback books, but certainly for eBooks and Paperbacks.

Clayton Graham