Exclusive Interview with

Alex Craigie

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When did you start writing?

I remember my mother laughing when I was six because I'd written a short story that had the baddie dismissed with the words You're Fired. When I was at Junior school they put on a play I'd written in rhyming couplets. I had to change Rupert's companion to a less fancy Sam to aid the rhyming process.

Alex Craigie
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What makes writing your passion?

It's like asking a singer why they sing or an artist why they paint. It's part compulsion part pleasure.

Alex Craigie
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How long have you been writing?

In terms of writing professionally, I started when I had to give up my teaching job when the children were young. I wrote short stories for magazines to supplement our income.

Alex Craigie
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What was the feeling when you published your first book?

I'd love to say that it was unbridled joy. It wasn't. I was terrified. There was a real fear that readers might find it ridiculous. I didn't tell any close friends at first. Fortunately, the first review I had in the UK was wonderful. Then I had another equally positive one from someone in America. Very few people leave reviews on Amazon and I spent a while in limbo before someone directed me to Goodreads and there was a raft of responses there that made my heart sing.

Alex Craigie
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What’s the story behind your choice of characters?

My first book, Someone Close to Home, was written because I was so disturbed about what I was seeing in care homes. One case in particular so upset me, I wrote it out of my system in an attempt to show people how it must feel to be trapped and vulnerable in an inadequate facility, or even one with a carer who shouldn't be working with vulnerable people. From the feedback I've had, this has resounded with people on both sides of the Atlantic.

Alex Craigie
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What annoys you the most in pursuing a writing career?

That's a hard one. Perhaps it's the lack of a level playing field between Indies and the big publishing companies. I've read some superb books that aren't appreciated because they don't have that oxygen of publicity that makes them visible to others.

Alex Craigie
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How do you get over the “writer’s block”?

I tell myself not to end the day without writing at least a sentence. Usually, that's all it takes to get the gears slowly turning again.

Alex Craigie
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We all know the writer’s path is never easy, what makes you keep going? What advice would you give to new authors?

I keep going because I still have things I want to say and characters in my head that want to be heard. There's plenty of advice out there but I'd say to get your first draft done and then keep going back through it until you're happy with all of it. If one section stands out as being particularly good then it possibly means that the bits around it need some attention.

Alex Craigie
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If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Don't see today as simply a stepping stone to another day. People tend to put off achieving things they want to do until the time is right. People look to the future without appreciating that today is part of your life, too. Live each day.

Alex Craigie
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Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with the bad ones?

I read all my reviews. With a couple of exceptions, they're all from strangers and to know that what I've written has been enjoyed by someone somewhere else in the world is a magical feeling. My first 3* review stung a bit but then I put things in perspective and now I can take the bad ones on the chin. Nothing can take away the pleasure from me of the reviews that make me want to dance with delight.

Alex Craigie
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What is the feeling when you get a good review?

See above!

Alex Craigie
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Have you ever incorporated something that happened to you in real life into your novels?

Yes. Both my books are prompted by situations that I've witnessed. The rest of the books are complete fiction.

Alex Craigie
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Which of your characters you can compare yourself with? Did you base that character on you?

Both of my protagonists are women of my own age and perhaps they're a version of me I'd like to be!

Alex Craigie
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What do you think, the book cover is as important as the story?

I know that the book cover is the thing that draws people in and so it's an important part of the process. On the other hand, if the content isn't good enough then no amount of artwork is going to make a success of it.

Alex Craigie
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Do you connect with your readers? Do you mind having a chat with them or you prefer to express yourself through your writing?

I'm very happy to connect with readers. I now know readers in the US who have become treasured friends. I'm poor with social media, however, and only have a Facebook account. Some authors spend more time keeping up with social media than they do on writing and I think that probably works in their favour. I'm a dinosaur.

Alex Craigie
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